Svengelska bloggen

Svengelska bloggen

Om bloggen/About the Blog

I aim to use this blog to keep up my English and maybe give others some insights in Swedish language. It's not a diary - well not quite...

Snöglopp

NaturföreteelserPosted by Gunvor 2012-04-06 16:49:36

Snöglopp is ’sleet’. Snö is ’snow’ of course. Glopp is related to glåpord – ‘jeer’, ‘abusive word’ and the verb glupa ‘to gobble’, ‘scoff’, with the adjective glupsk ‘voracious’. There is also Swedish dialect glåp and Norvegian glop ‘gaping mouth’ So glopp is originally something which comes from a big mouth or hole (Hellquist: Svensk etymologisk ordbok). So far I have found only Scandinavian relations, but guess it could be related to English glut 'to swallow too much' which comes via Old French gloter from Latin gluttire 'swallow', 'gulp down' from the Indoeuropean root *gwele- ‘to swallow’.

This was taken from my window a few hours ago. Now it is almost white outside:

Addition 2012-04-09: More snow, sleet and rain today again. And more birds (or the same probably): Herr och Fru Domherre, 'Mr and Mrs Bullfinch.

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Lunta

NaturföreteelserPosted by Gunvor 2012-03-25 19:28:25

Att lunta is to set fire to last year’s grass. It’s fun but can be dangerous. The verb is created from the noun lunta meaning ‘fuse’ but also a ‘big fat book’ or ‘bundle of papers’. Lunta comes from Low German lunte, ‘rag’.

Hjärta

NaturföreteelserPosted by Gunvor 2012-01-24 13:33:34

Hjärta, Icelandic hjarta, English heart, German Herz, from a Germanic stem *hertan- is one of those words that are most easily followed all the way back to Indoeuropean *kerd- , *krd-, with relatives such as Latin cor, cordis and Greek kardia.

Close to hjärta in the dictionary is hjärna, ‘brain’ , Icelandic hjarne, German Hirn, from the Germanic stem *hirzan- , Indoeuropean *kerz-, Latin cerebrum and Greek kranion.

English brain, Old English brægen, has relatives only in West Germanic languages (Dutch brein). Origin is unclear, but it could be Germanic. *bragnam coming from Indoeuropean *bhragno 'something broken'. (Or, rather *mregh-m(n)o- - to compare with Greek brekhmos 'top of the head').

(The Christmas tree is not with us now.)

Katt-TV

NaturföreteelserPosted by Gunvor 2012-01-22 14:48:52

Katt-TV is 'cat TV', popular this time of the year.

This was yesterday when the snow was coming and the birds were eager to feed.

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